The Journey: Episode Twenty-Five

OCTOBER 12, 2020

First update in a long while. I couldn’t afford my other insulin, Novolog 70/30 mix, so I decided to just keep taking my Lantus. I told my doctor about it and he said that’s fine. I just have to monitor my blood sugar more than I was before which was morning and night. He also wants me to check after I eat as well to see what elevates my sugar and all that.

My sugar has been more in range lately so that’s a plus. But I’m still experiencing more highs than lows. I’m taking my dog outside more because she’s getting restless at home now. Our room is too small but I don’t trust her bladder out in the rest of the house. She can’t be outside for too long, it’s really hot here and she overheats easily so I usually wait until after the sun is beyond Mauna Kea when it’s cooler on our side of the island and let her walk around. The fresh air has been a huge welcome for me. I can’t let her out of my sight. Last time she crawled under the bed and got stuck under there until we pulled her out.

Otherwise, life has been really off. My birthday was this past Friday and we got to go on a road trip to Waimea and back with my dog, she kind of enjoyed it. She was so tired afterwards. I wanted to go to the beach but it was Fall Break here and the beaches were crowded so maybe this week we’ll go to the beach.

That’s pretty much what’s going on right now. I need to come back to this blog and write some more. There are a lot of distractions in my life right now and I need to control them better.

You’re Diabetic, Now What?

Your doctor gave you the dreaded diagnosis. Your blood tests are in and it’s confirmed. You’re either prediabetic or fully diabetic. What is there left to do? Well you could wallow in your own self doubt OR you could take a stand and get your life in order! Let’s go with the second option and take your life back!

For starters, you can ask your doctor the list of questions from the previous post, Questions to Ask Your Doctor. Those questions can help you get started on the right path. Another thing to ask your doctor for are specialist recommendations. Just like in the previous post, Your Diabetes Care Team, you’re going to need some help from specialists, like a podiatrist (foot doctor) and ophthalmologist (eye doctor).

Hopefully, if you’re just prediabetic, you won’t need a complete team behind you. Your Primary Care Physician (PCP) might be able to prescribe you some of the usual diabetes medication, like metformin, and monitor your numbers from there.

I’m not going to lie. I wish I had been more on it with my medication when I was diagnosed as prediabetic. Sometimes, I wonder if I would be where I am today if I had taken it seriously. Take this time to rethink your life and get serious with your prediabetes before it becomes diabetes. Don’t skip any of your medications, I promise they help. I know with metformin there are some side effects the first couple of weeks, those are normal as your body adjusts to the medication. It’s not normal if it lasts beyond two weeks, consult your doctor if this occurs.

As a prediabetic, ask your doctor if they can refer you to a dietician to help you get on the right diet plan to curb your appetite and lose weight before things get serious. Losing just 10% of your current body weight can drastically reduce your chances of developing full blown diabetes.

If you’re not so lucky and you’re fully diabetic, there’s still hope. The key to diabetes is never losing hope in yourself. Believe in your own strength and seek support from others. If your family and friends don’t understand or you don’t feel comfortable confiding in them, look for support groups on Facebook. I recently joined one and I have been able to share my support with other diabetic women. We also share recipes and advice with each other. It’s a very supportive environment.

If you ever feel like you need additional support, you can always reach out to me and I’ll be one of your biggest cheerleaders.

Now that you’re diabetic, do not ever let this diagnosis and disease define you. Let this one setback show your strengths and make a difference in your life for the better. It’s a long journey to managing and controlling your diabetes, but you can do this! Remember, your Diabetic Care Team is there to support you. And while I absolutely appreciate you reading my content, don’t let this be your one-stop-shop for information. Let my content guide you to your other questions and find your own answers. I hope my content can help guide you to asking the right questions and lead you on your own path. Remember, no one knows your body better than you do.


Spread the Word

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Questions to Ask Your Doctor

So your doctor has officially diagnosed you with diabetes. That’s pretty heavy, but don’t let this be your downfall. Let this diagnosis be the start of your amazing journey. Here are some questions you can ask your doctor to help you on your journey.

  1. What are the results of my blood tests (especially my A1C)? What was my previous A1C and what should my goal number be?
  2. What is my blood sugar target? How often do I need to test my blood sugar levels?
  3. What diet and exercise changes can I make to be healthier?
  4. Are oral medications an option for me?
  5. Could non-insulin injections help me manage my diabetes?
  6. Why are there two types of insulin (basal, or long-acting, and bolus, or rapid-acting)? Are either of them right for me right now?
  7. What is low blood sugar and what can I do to avoid a low blood sugar?
  8. Can you recommend a diabetes education program or a diabetes educator?
  9. Do I need to consult a dietician?
  10. How many times should I check my blood sugar each day?

These questions can help you and your healthcare team come up with a treatment and management plan. Knowing this information can help you come up with a plan for exercise, diet, and diabetes management.


Spread the Word

Did you like this post? Do you know someone that could benefit from it? Share it with your family and friends!

Follow the Young and Diabetic to get a free Diabetic Log download!

Use it to log your medication, blood sugar, exercise, and food every day.

Get new content delivered directly to your inbox.

Want to see more from this blog? Take this survey to tell me what you want to learn more about!


References

Healthmonitor, Guide to Diabetes, pg. 16.